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Reproductive Health

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What is a contraceptive implant?

The contraceptive implant is a thin, flexible, plastic rod (4cm x 2mm) containing a progestogen hormone. It is inserted, after local anaesthetic, under the skin of the inner upper arm by a doctor. The procedure takes only a few minutes. The implant prevents pregnancy by releasing small but constant amounts of the hormone into the body via the bloodstream. Specifically, this prevents pregnancy by blocking ovulation (the release of eggs from the ovaries). It also thickens the mucus at the cervix so that so that sperm cannot get through to meet an egg. It lasts for 3 years, but is easily reversible.

Why is having a cervical cancer screening important?

Cervical cancer screening looks for changes in the cells of your cervix. Changes happen very slowly but can lead to serious problems like cervical cancer. If abnormal cells are detected they can be closely observed and/or treated to prevent cancer developing. Having a pap smear or VIA every two to three years can prevent the most common form of cervical cancer in up to 90% of cases

How do I prevent an STI?

Condoms are the only form of contraception that can protect you against contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). If you have unprotected sex, even just once, you are at risk of contracting an STI. If you have had unprotected sex it is advised you visit your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic today for a sexual health check.

What are the treatments for STIs?

Treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) varies depending on the type. Symptoms are varied and can be very similar; some STIs can also present no obvious symptoms at all. The best way to make sure you are clear of any STI is to get tested at your local Marie Stopes International clinic. If you have an STI it is important that you and your current partner(s) receive the same treatment at the same time; otherwise you may continue to pass the infection back and forth between you. All of your previous sexual partners whom you feel may be at risk should also be checked and treated, this is called contact tracing or partner notification.

What are the symptoms of STIs?

Symptoms of sexually transmitted infections (STI) vary depending on the type and some STI symptoms can be very similar, while some STIs present no obvious symptoms at all. This makes STIs difficult to diagnose over the phone or online. While testing is the only way to know if you have an STI it is important to look out for any sores, ulcers, lumps, warts or blisters on the genitals and surrounding area as well as discomfort and discharge. To be sure you are clear of an STI make an appointment at your local Marie Stopes International clinic today for a sexual health check. It may be nothing at all, but a simple sexual health check is all you need to ensure you are in the clear.

How do I get an STI?

The most common way sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are transmitted is through vaginal, anal or oral sex without a condom. However some STIs like genital warts can be transmitted via close skin contact, usually during unprotected sex. The best way to protect yourself from an STI (and an unplanned pregnancy) is to always use a condom and water-based lube when having vaginal, anal or oral sex.

What is an STI?

Sexually transmitted infection (STI) is an umbrella term for infections that are passed through the exchanging of bodily fluids or close body contact, usually through unprotected sex. Some STIs have obvious symptoms, while others can lie dormant for years if left unchecked. The best way to protect yourself from an STI (and an unplanned pregnancy) is to always use a condom and water-based lube when having vaginal, anal or oral sex.

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