Genital herpes

HOẶC XEM THEO CHỦ ĐỀ BÊN DƯỚI

How do I treat herpes?

Mild cases of herpes can be treated with medication cream (e.g. cold sores) however there is no known cure so outbreaks can recur. Antiviral tablets for outbreaks or to suppress recurrent outbreaks are recommended, as well as saline baths for pain relief.
Sexual contact should be avoided from the first indication of an infection until the skin has returned to normal.
 

How do I prevent catching herpes?

If you notice persistent itching or tingling in the genital area or an outbreak of blisters (sometimes painful) you should refrain from having sex.  If your partner has visible signs of a herpes outbreak, sexual contact should be avoided from the first indication of an infection until the skin has returned to normal. Depending on where the outbreak occurs, condoms go a long way towards reducing your risk of transmission.
If you think you or your partner has herpes it is recommended you visit your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic to be tested.
 

What are the symptoms of herpes?

The first outbreak of genital herpes is usually the worst, with symptoms appearing 3-10 days after contact. Blisters can be found wherever skin-to-skin contact occurred during sex, so that's on the penis in men, and labia, clitoris, and vulva in women, but infections can also occur in the anus, or on the buttocks and inner thighs. Recurrent episodes are usually less severe and of shorter duration.

What is herpes?

Herpes refers to the herpes simplex virus (HSV). There are two types of HSV: Type 1 is usually found around the lips and is commonly known as a cold sore; Type 2 is usually found around the genital or anal areas, which is why it is referred to as genital herpes. Herpes is transmitted via close skin contact including unprotected sex and can sometimes be transmitted even when people have no symptoms of the virus. Genital herpes can also be transmitted from mouth to genitals during oral sex.