Gonorrhea

HOẶC XEM THEO CHỦ ĐỀ BÊN DƯỚI

How do I treat gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is included in almost all sexual health checks and will be detected by a urine test or a swab collected from the affected area. Once diagnosed gonorrhea can be treated by a course of antibiotics.
If you have had unprotected sex since your last sexual health screen it is recommended you get tested at your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic.

How do I prevent catching gonorrhea?

Condoms and water-based lube offer you the best protection against gonorrhea, and have the added bonus of being an excellent form of contraception against an unplanned pregnancy. Other tips to avoid contracting gonorrhea include washing hands immediately after sex and avoiding hand-to-eye contact.
If you have unprotected sex, even just once, you are at risk of contracting an STI.  If you have had unprotected sex since your last sexual health screen it is recommended you get tested at your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic.

 

What are the symptoms of gonorrhea?

In women, the symptoms of gonorrhea can include yellow or green vaginal discharge, pain during sex, abdominal pain or burning when urinating. The symptoms for men can include yellow discharge from penis, irritation/discharge from anus and pain in the testicles or when urinating. While most men who have gonorrhea will have noticeable symptoms, many women who have gonorrhea may show no symptoms, particularly if they have it in their throat.

What is gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea (also known as the clap) is a bacterial infection of the genitals, throat or rectum. It is sexually transmitted through vaginal, anal or oral sex, or transmitted via fingers from genitals to the eyes. If left untreated it may lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women or even infertility for both men and women. Symptoms usually appear 3-5 days after contact with infection, or in some cases symptoms may lie dormant.