Genital warts

HOẶC XEM THEO CHỦ ĐỀ BÊN DƯỚI

Can I have sex after being treated for genital warts?

Sex should be avoided until all the lesions have healed (this could take 1-2 weeks). In men, it is suggested that erections be avoided for the first week so that splitting of the healing skin does not occur. Condoms should be used until you have been shown to be free of warts for 6 months. Oral sex should also be avoided for 3-6 months. If the warts reoccur after treatment, sex should be avoided until further treatment and advice from your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic.

How do I treat genital warts?

While in some cases it is possible for warts to disappear without treatment, there is no way to ensure this will happen. Therefore if you suspect you have genital warts you should visit your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic for an examination. If you have identified an outbreak the warts can be removed by a healthcare professional using a number of methods depending on the size and location of the warts. The sooner the warts are treated, the better the response. Although treatments can get rid of the warts, there is no treatment for HPV. Because the virus is still present in your body, warts often come back after treatment. Recurrences of genital warts after treatment occur in about one in three people, in which case further treatment is required.

How do I prevent catching genital warts?

Genital warts are highly contagious. You can get them through sexual contact such as vaginal, anal and oral sex (rare). You can also get them via close genital to genital contact – this need not be penetrative. Genital warts cannot be caught from toilet seats or in swimming pools.
About two-thirds of people who have sexual contact with a partner with genital warts will develop warts, usually within 3 months of contact. If you are infected with HPV but have no symptoms, you can still become a carrier of the virus and infect someone else who could then in turn develop genital warts.
Depending on where the outbreak occurs, condoms go a long way towards reducing your risk of transmission. There is also a vaccination against certain strains of HPV. To find out more about the HPV vaccination or to get tested for genital warts it is recommended you visit your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic for a sexual health check.
 

What are the symptoms of genital warts?

The symptoms of genital warts are the appearance of small fleshy lumps or cauliflower-like clusters that appear around the genital areas of men and women including the vagina, cervix, vulva (area outside of the vagina), penis, and rectum. Your healthcare provider usually diagnoses genital warts by seeing them.
Women with genital warts should also be examined for possible human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the cervix. Your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic can diagnose HPV infection based on results from an abnormal pap smear.
 

What are genital warts?

Genital warts are the most common type of sexually transmitted infection (STI). They are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), however not all those infected with HPV will develop genital warts. The warts are visible small fleshy lumps or clusters that appear around the genital areas of men and women including the vagina, cervix, vulva (area outside of the vagina), penis, and rectum. Sometimes it is often difficult to determine how or when transmission occurred, but we do know that HPV is passed on via close body contact usually during unprotected sex.