Emergency Contraceptive Pill

HOẶC XEM THEO CHỦ ĐỀ BÊN DƯỚI

Where can I get the morning after pill?

If you have had unprotected sex and your contraception has failed (such as a broken condom) or you have forgotten to take the contraceptive pill, you can get the emergency contraceptive pill from most pharmacies without a prescription. Your pharmacist will need to ask a few simple questions before you can receive it. In some cases, you will not be able to purchase emergency contraception from your pharmacist and your pharmacist may refer you to a doctor. It is important to remember that the emergency contraceptive pill only works when you take it within 96 hours (four days) since engaging in unprotected sex, with the effectiveness decreasing after the first 24 hours.

How often can I use the morning after pill?

Although there is no limit to the number of times you can take the emergency contraceptive pill, you should only use this in an emergency situation and not as a regular method of contraception. It does not prevent pregnancies as well as other contraceptive methods, and also does not protect you against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). If the emergency contraceptive pill is used more than once in a menstrual cycle it is more likely to upset your menstrual cycle.
If you find yourself regularly requiring the emergency contraceptive pill it is recommended you visit your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic to discuss your contraceptive options

What if the morning after pill doesn’t work?

If you do not get your period within three weeks of taking the emergency contraceptive pill it is advised that you visit your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic as there may be a chance that you are pregnant. There is no evidence that the emergency contraceptive pill will harm the development of the foetus if you decide to continue the pregnancy. However there are other options available to you should you decide not to continue the pregnancy.

What should I do next, after taking the morning after pill?

After taking the emergency contraceptive pill you must continue to use a reliable method of contraception. The emergency contraceptive pill will not protect you against future unprotected sex. If you are already taking the contraceptive pill but have missed one, continue taking it and follow the missed pill instructions. It is advised that you make an appointment with your local doctor or Marie Stopes International clinic within 2 - 3 weeks to assess the effectiveness of the emergency contraceptive pill and discuss a reliable method of contraception for you. If you do not get your period within three weeks of taking the emergency contraceptive pill you must see a doctor as you may be pregnant.

What are the side effects of the morning after pill?

Mild and short-term side effects of the emergency contraceptive pill can include nausea, vomiting and tiredness. You may also experience abdominal pain, diarrhoea, dizziness, headaches, tender breasts and vaginal bleeding. If you vomit within two hours of taking the emergency contraceptive pill you will need to take an additional tablet. If successful in preventing pregnancy, most women will have a normal period at the normal time, though it may come early or a little late

Who should not take the morning after pill?

You should not take the emergency contraceptive pill if:
- you have had unprotected sex more than 120 hours (five days) ago
- you think you might be pregnant
- your period is late you should not take the emergency contraceptive pill.
Before you purchase the emergency contraceptive pill you should tell you doctor or the pharmacist if you suffer from high blood pressure, diabetes, severe liver disease, have had heart disease, a stroke or breast cancer, and also if you are taking any medications.

How effective is the morning after ill?

When taken within 24 hours of unprotected sex the emergency contraceptive pill will prevent 95% of expected pregnancies. This decreases to 85% when the emergency contraceptive pill is taken up to 72 hours after unprotected sex. The emergency contraceptive pill may be effective up to 96 hours (four days) after unprotected sex, but its effectiveness decreases significantly with time