IUD

HOẶC XEM THEO CHỦ ĐỀ BÊN DƯỚI

Where can I get an IUD from?

An intrauterine device (also known as an IUD) must be inserted by a trained doctor and are available at some local doctors and Marie Stopes International clinics. Some doctors do not keep stock of the IUD on hand, so will have to provide you with a prescription which you can get filled at a pharmacist, and return to the doctor to have it inserted

Can I get a new IUD inserted when I get the old one removed?

It is possible to have a new intrauterine device (also known as IUD) inserted immediately after the other one is removed.

How is an IUD removed?

Removal of an intrauterine device (also known as an IUD) is simpler than the insertion and it can be removed at any time in your cycle. However, if you do not want to become pregnant it is important to use an alternative method of contraception in the week leading up to the removal of the device as sex during this week could result in unplanned pregnancy after the device is removed. You should never attempt to remove the device yourself and always seek the assistance of a healthcare professional.

How often do I check the strings?

You should check for strings of your intrauterine device (also known as an IUD) once a month after each period, as the device will not be effective if not correctly placed. If you cannot feel the strings at any time or if you feel anything unusual such as a hard piece of plastic, you should consult your doctor and use an alternative method of contraception until the placement of the device has been checked.

How do I check the strings?

The strings of the intrauterine device (also known as IUD) are so fine they usually stick together, so you will probably feel only 'one' string. Before checking for the strings it is important to wash your hands to prevent any infections. Get into a squatting position (as you would to insert a tampon) so you can insert one or two fingers deep into your vagina. By reaching right up inside your vagina you will feel the cervix at the far end (which feels like the tip of your nose). You should be able to feel the strings coming through the cervix – be careful not to pull on them.
Checking for the strings may sometimes be difficult. If you cannot feel the strings at any time or if you feel anything unusual such as a hard piece of plastic, you should consult your doctor and use an alternative method of contraception until the placement of the device has been checked. You may require an ultrasound to determine the position of the device.

How do I know if my IUD has moved?

Intrauterine devices (also known as IUDs) have two fine nylon strings attached to them which, when in place, come out through the cervix. It is important for you to learn how to feel for the strings of the device yourself to check it is correctly in place.

How is an IUD inserted?

Before you are fitted with a intrauterine device (also known as an IUD) your doctor will discuss and assess the suitability of this contraceptive method with you during an initial consultation (including the advantages and disadvantages).
Following the initial consultation and your consent, the doctor will insert a speculum into your vagina (the same as would occur if you were having a pap smear) to view your cervix. The cervix and vagina are then cleaned with antiseptic lotion, and a thin, flexible plastic tube is then used to insert the IUD into the uterus. The tube is then removed and threads cut. In some cases small amount of local anaesthetic may be used to numb the cervix. Preparation for fitting usually takes a few minutes but the actual fitting of the IUD only takes a few seconds. Some women may find the insertion moderately uncomfortable or feel slightly faint after insertion or removal of the device. This is a normal reaction which should pass within a few minutes. You may take a mild pain killer prior to the insertion if you prefer.
To avoid infection, do not insert anything in to the vagina for 48 hours following the insertion of the IUD (i.e. avoid sexual penetration and use pads instead of tampons for two days after the insertion). You will be asked to return for your first check-up after your first period, usually about six weeks after insertion. It is also important to have regular check-ups with your doctor once a year to ensure all is well. These check-ups can be conveniently done at the same time as a pap smear.